I started collecting my pieces of modernist furniture and objects when I first moved to my new apartment in 1984 and I did it in a completely emotional way, without any philological pretensions.
All of a sudden, I found myself out of my parents home, free to furnish it the way I liked and with very little money to do so.

At that time the young people still tended to buy antique or wicker furniture for their living rooms, they were still trying to put their hands on grandmother’s silver sets and they were still placing here and there abajours to give the apartment a chic atmosphere.

  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery

I frankly had enough of that taste and with my small budget and a lot of trips to the rubbish dumping ground, I managed to put together a look that reflected what for me was a more up to date attitude: something between the dark- no future- existentialism and the new-minimalistic-snob-way of life.
Everything that belonged to the ’40s, 50’s, ’60s and ’70s (not a day before, not a week later) was interesting and valuable for me and my close group of friends. While everybody else was floating in the unbearable bad taste of the ’80s we were filling up our dwellings with the precious waste of those who pursued the most current trends. My family members, when they were visiting me, we’re looking at my styling choice with some pity and I could guess their hope in a future repentance.

History, however, is on my side and I must say that today, after almost forty years, to see that the most acclaimed designers copy the shapes, the fabrics and the aesthetics of those years in a more or less detached way, makes me smile a little.
But if you share with me a deep love for the Design born and developed in its golden age, there is a place, a small kingdom, that you must visit.

I’m talking about a shop in Rome, Spot Gallery, that by the way is located a few steps from the MAXXI, National Museum of the XXI Century Arts, a project that Zaha Hadid completed in 2010, very close to the Flaminio stadium, designed by Pier Luigi Nervi and not far from the Parco della Musica of Renzo Piano fame.

  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery
  • Spot Gallery

Spot Gallery, a modern store specialized in furniture and furnishing accessories rigorously signed, is located in an area of Rome that betrays the ancient, baroque and religious vocation of the city and reveals its most up to date and modernist character. Beyond the Tiber, in fact, you can visit the sports facilities of the Fascist Era, with their powerful volumes and metaphysical white profiles.
Both Manuela di Loreto e Riccardo Forti, the owners of Spot Gallery, have a design training, have collaborated with famous Italian architects and designers such as Ettore Sottsass, Enzo Mari and have worked as freelance designers for various companies like Armani home. As a matter of fact, the shop is conceived as something between a store and a gallery and you can find their original contemporary pieces among the vintage ones.

Their deep knowledge of the Design history and the scrupulousness with which they conduct their research makes Spot Gallery a reference point for anyone who is looking for a certified and guaranteed purchase and for those who need a professional interior consulting as well.

The coziness of the store, the kindness of the owners, who are artists way before being sellers, will drive you back to the magical time where art and design, beauty and function, enjoyment and taste were playing together in the pencil of great specialist and in the activity of illuminated entrepreneurs.

Betti

Spot Design Gallery

Web Site : http://www.spotgallery.it/2/

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